Weathering the Storm


Have you ever driven through a town after a massive hurricane? The town looks worn down, beaten, but in a way stronger because it has made it through the storm, and will live to see another day. When you live with a chronic pain condition, your body feels just like that town, worn down and yet in a strange way it grows stronger.

Growing up in the south, you learn to listen to the weatherman during the same time every year and just prepare for stormy weather. Once and a while, the “big one” hits, and when it does, there is no doubt what must be done. Time to board up the windows; place sand bags where needed; bring the potted plants and garden furniture inside, and just batten down the hatches. There’s no use trying to hide.

Living with a chronic condition is like living in the storm belt of the south. Each condition has its own health hurricanes, as it may. After a while, you learn how to predict when they are coming, and how to prepare for them. The hardest part is learning to listening to your own body and taking the proper precautions before its too late.

Just like with any natural disaster preparation, when it comes to your health, making an escape route or a game plan can be your greatest ally. When a crisis hits or your pain is at its highest level, it is hard to think straight which can make it difficult for you to eliminate your pain or communicate to others what you need.

An easy way to make a pain relief strategy is to simply make a few lists of what types of pain you have, what makes that pain better, and then what makes that pain worse.

It sounds like a lot to do. But simply start brainstorming your lists together and it’s amazing what you will discover about yourself. Do the lists in whatever order feels best for your situation. Remember there are no right or wrong answers here. Just be honest with yourself.

List 1) Pain:
What types of pain do you have?
Write down whatever comes to mind. You can list physical and emotional issues here.

Examples: trouble sleeping, depression, all over body aches, headache, sharp right hand pain, dull lower back pain, constipation, etc.

List 2) Solution/ Therapy:
What helps you? What makes you feel better.
(I have done this list two different ways. I have simply jotted down things that help me out, and other times I match specific therapies to a type of physical or emotion pain.)

Examples: Heating pad, hot bath, medication, cold compress, stretching exercise, diet

List 3) Stressor/ Cause:
What makes things worse?
I find this list the most difficult to do. Take your time writing down things that you know make your pain worse. You might want to just keep a journal, and note how you feel each night before you go to bed. Write down in your journal any activities or changes in your routine that impacted your condition.

Examples: diet, sleep pattern, weather changes, money stressors (I notice that after talking to the health insurance companies my pain increases the next day), airplane travel, exercise (over or under doing it)

Now match up with your lists, pain with solution/therapy to stressor/ cause. When you are done you will have a chart that will help you listen to your own body. And when you can’t think because the pain is too high, all you have to do is look at your list.

Remember that this is just guide for you. It can be changed, altered, or simply thrown away and started all over again. Don’t be afraid to learn and grow. You have weathered the storm and you will be better for it.

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About Amy Higgins
Social mediaholic. Incurable content creator. Hardcore bacon nerd. Opera aficionado. Presently @TopRank Marketing Formerly @Zendesk @Concur @GoogleLocalSF

2 Responses to Weathering the Storm

  1. flourishwithfibro says:

    Hi Jen!
    Please know that you are not in this struggle alone. All of us with Fibro hide some part of it, including ourselves, from those around us. The trick is not to hide your entire self behind your fibro. Remember who you are and that you are not your illness. It is just a part of you, or rather an accessory, like a ring that you never take off. It helps me to say something positive about my day, especially when my pain is at its worst. That way I am always trying to find the silver lining. And remember to laugh at yourself! I find it funny when I leave my keys in the fridge or do major typos at work because my pain is too high. Laughter is key! -Amy

  2. Jen says:

    Thank you for this site. My cousin turned me on to it (I think you went to high school with her, Judy D). I was just diagnosed in December, but have pretty much known for a couple years that I’ve got fibromyalgia–but hid it from everyone, including doctors! Your blog is giving me valuable insights as I learn to struggle visibly with this condition.

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