Chronic Pain: High Wire Act

In the early morning, as the dew is still wet on my window, I catch slight glimpses of what can only be images of my past life. I am on a high wire inside a big brightly colored red and yellow striped tent struggling to find my balance. Light-headed from the lack of oxygen, my arms fully stretched out, and the view of the dirt floor many feet below me, this early morning dream leads me to believe that even the slightest move will send me falling to my death. Each journey out across that tightrope should be easier; however, every walk is different, every crossing new, and each path comes with it’s own challenges.

Living with chronic pain is like walking that high wire. You must find your own balance to make it through your day. The Flying Wallendas had courage every time they journeyed across their high wire. Just like them, living with chronic pain is a performance art of unfathomable courage and skill. For when I hurt, I have to pick myself up and try all over again, never showing pain or fear. For just when you think your life is under control, something happens to throw you off. It always does. The audience gasps in amazement. You can hear them almost whisper in your ear, “You can do it, just one more step”. While others are just there to watch you fall. The question is who are you going to listen to as you make your journey across your own tightrope. Even without all the glitz and glamour inside that big red and yellow striped tent, we are walking that same high wire on a tight balance of survival.

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About Amy Higgins
Social mediaholic. Incurable content creator. Hardcore bacon nerd. Opera aficionado. Presently @TopRank Marketing Formerly @Zendesk @Concur @GoogleLocalSF

9 Responses to Chronic Pain: High Wire Act

  1. natalie says:

    High Wire Act. Thank you for this. It describes the experience in a poetic and insightful way. I feel much less alone.

  2. Bob D says:

    I had absolutely no idea. You’re always so cheerful. You continually show the kind of courage and strength to which the rest of us should aspire. I have another friend with FM and she’s just like you, always cheerful and optimistic. I know that somehow you’ll be able to conquer this, at least from within.
    BD

    • flourishwithfibro says:

      Thanks Bob! I always say that I have FM but it does not have me! Sometimes just a simple smile on a rainy day can make everything better. 🙂 Amy

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  7. ditsyhaze says:

    so true, thank you xx

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