Reiki: does it work for Fibro?

reiki-1 Since Fibromyalgia is such a complex condition, it takes a intricate level of healing to manage its symptoms. One has to look out side the realm of just modern medicine and sometimes back to ancient eastern medicine for cures for pain.
Reiki is a Japanese healing practice that promotes health and well being through a non-invasive technique. And for people affected by fibromyalgia, non-invasive is key. Anything that we can do that does not hurt us that will help to lower our stress levels and improve our overall well-being, we will try. ( Hey, I remember one time being in pain, I placed cod-liver oil on my stomach because I read somewhere that it would help reduce my cramps. It didn’t. It made a huge mess. I still laugh about it today, and that laughter is important. So, in the end it worked.) Reiki works by laying hands on the person to help them. It is based on the idea of our life’s energy force is what keeps us healthy. When that energy gets low, we get sick. The cool thing about it is, you can practice it by yourself, have someone help you, and you do not have to stop your other medical treatments to try it. But do it work for fibromyalgia patients?

The NCCAM (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) says that Reiki does not improve symptoms for patients of fibromyalgia, based on their study. At the University of Washington, Seattle, the researchers did a study of 100 people funded by the NCCAM to see how Reiki worked on people with fibro . They tried Reiki on a couple of different ways- hands on subject, and hands off subject, neither of which produced any affect on their pain. Are their too many variables when it comes to fibromyalgia to do a proper test? Or is this ancient art of healing which dates back to the 1800s just too old for the complexity of fibromyalgia?

What do you think?

To read what NCCA has to say, look here: nccam.nih.gov/research/results/spotlight/050809.htm

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Study of Naltrexone effects continues

Researchers at Standford are now into their next stage of clinical trials of looking at low doses of Naltrexone for use with fibromyalgia patients. The first study which was implemented early in 2007 showed hope that Naltrexone might work for fibro patients with little side effects. Typically, Naltrexone is used in 50 mg dose to help treat alcohol and opiate addiction. They tested the drug for fibro in a very low dose, around to 4.5 mg. Instead of blocking the bodies pain receptors, the dosage of the medication “modulated activity of glial cells to act as a neuroprotectant and suppressant of proinflammatory cytokines”. (medpagetoday) The study was lead by Jarred Younger, PhD and Sean Mackey, MD, PhD. Here’s a great chart showing their results:
ldn
“Overall, self-reported, daily fibromyalgia symptoms (scale 0 – 100, with 100 being most severe symptoms). Time periods are: baseline, placebo, LDN, and washout. The data are separated into drug responders (solid line, 6 people) and drug nonresponders (broken line, 4 people). Drug responders are individuals who had at least a 30% greater reduction of symptoms during LDN versus placebo.” -stanford.edu

Hopefully by the end of this year we will know if the dug will help those of us with fibromyalgia.

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Link to Stanford post

ResearchChannel – An Update on Fibromyalgia

Here’s a great lecture from The Standford University Medical Center Health Hour:
ResearchChannel – An Update on Fibromyalgia

Shared via AddThis

Exercising with Fibro

I know what you are thinking, ” Exercising with Fibromyalgia? Are you nuts? I hurt all over. How on earth am I supposed to exercise?!” I know that is exactly how I have been feeling for the past 8 years of my life. Then one day I woke up and said, “Fibro will not win. I might have a chronic condition, but it does not have me!” That was step number one, making the mental choice to change my life for the positive.

Step number two is a little harder. It came when I physically tried doing something. My body does not respond the way it did before fibromyalgia was apart of my life. Some days I hurt too much to even get out of bed. And other days I feel good enough to go to work and out with friends in the evening. Therefore, the challenge is how to add exercise into my daily routine on my good days and my bad.

Now at this point, I’m sure you are asking why exercise at all, especially on the days where my pain is the worst. Here is why:

Exercise will:

* Help alleviate your pain naturally

* Increase your flexibility

* Strengthen your muscles and joints

* Strengthen your immune system

* Help you sleep better

* Help your circulatory system

* Decrease risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart attack and stroke

* Help you lose weight; which reduces stress on your joints

For more information on why exercise is important, please see this research study done by Dr.Rooks, published in Archives of Internal Medicine.

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